13.1.16

New Business Immigration Programs in Ontario Provide Fresh Opportunities to Invest in Canada

New Business Immigration Programs in Ontario Provide Fresh Opportunities to Invest in Canada


Entrepreneur and Corporate streams differ from old Investor category


Canada’s most populated province, Ontario, has provided details on two new business immigration programs that are now open to eligible candidates wishing to invest in the Canadian economy. As the leader in attracting foreign direct investment of any province or state in North America, Ontario’s new business streams are likely to prove popular.
The Entrepreneur Stream and the Corporate Stream both operate under the Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP), a Provincial Nominee Program that allows Ontario to nominate individuals deemed to have credentials that would benefit the local labour market. Ontario is home to Canada’s capital city, Ottawa, and Canada’s largest city, Toronto, which is located close to other major North American markets.
The OINP Entrepreneur Stream
The OINP Entrepreneur Stream is designed to attract individuals who are looking to implement a new business initiative or buy an existing business in Ontario. The OINP Entrepreneur Stream operates on an ‘Expression of Interest’ model, whereby eligible participants must be invited to apply before they may submit a complete application.
Successful applicants will obtain a temporary work permit support letter, based on a performance agreement, to establish the business in Ontario. If the investment and job creation agreements outlined in the performance agreement are adhered to, entrepreneurs will have the opportunity to be nominated for Canadian permanent resident status through the OINP. To learn more about the OINP Entrepreneur Stream, click here.
The OINP Corporate Stream
The OINP Corporate Stream helps and supports established international corporations looking to expand into Ontario or buy an existing business. Once the business has been successfully established, key staff are eligible to apply for a provincial nomination certificate, allowing them to eventually become permanent residents of Canada.
There are a range of requirements for this stream, with criteria covering the corporation, the investment, local job creation, key staff and employment. To learn more about eligibility requirements and processes for the OINP Corporate Stream, click here. 
How are the new business streams different from the old Investor category?
Ontario closed its OINP Investor category on October 29, 2015, and announced that details of the new business streams would be provided in due course. Now that these details are in the public domain, stakeholders are wondering how these options differ from each other, as well as how they compare with the now-defunct Investor category.
“The two new business immigration streams for Ontario really are a breath of fresh air. It looks like the government of Ontario has done its homework and noted what works in other regions of the world,” says Attorney David Cohen.
“The Entrepreneur Stream is not too dissimilar to the EB-5 program in the United States, the main difference being that the Ontario version, like many new Canadian immigration programs, operates under an Expression of Interest system. The main benefit of this to the province and candidates alike is that it is demand-driven; this should allow for quick program delivery processes, and applicants will know that they have actually been chosen by the government based on their strong profile.
“Meanwhile, the Corporate Stream is all about either taking a successful business operation and expanding it into one of the most open, diverse, and stable markets in the world, or identifying an existing business in Ontario and taking it to the next level. Successful applicants to either of these streams will be developing their careers and portfolios in a beautiful and thriving region of North America.”

21.11.15

Business Migration to Australia

Business Migration to Australia



If you have a background in business management or high level investment activities and are interested in investing in Australia, starting up a new business in Australia or purchasing an ownership interest in an existing Australian business, you and your family may be eligible for permanent residence status under Australia's business migration program.In most cases you will be required to enter Australia on a Provisional 4 year visa, after which you may apply for permanent residence through the Residence Visa categories.
State/Territory Sponsorship
Australia encourages business investment in rural and regional areas and State and Territory government sponsorship for is available for business people who can assist in the economic development of these areas. Sponsorship is available for each Provisional and Residence visa categories listed below.
Temporary Visa categories:-
Business Owner (Provisional) Visa
Business Owner (Provisional) visas allow people who have ownership interests in businesses to reside in Australia for up to 4 years to establish or invest in a business there.
Senior Executive (Provisional) Visa
Senior executives with management experience in a large overseas corporation may be granted a 4 year provisional visa in Australia under this visa category. Once in Australia, they are expected to establish or make a significant investment in an Australian business.
Investor (Provisional) Visa
Investor (Provisional) visas are granted to applicants who have maintained a considerable investment portfolio or ownership in a business, and are willing to make an investment of at least A$750,000 in Australian bonds for 4 years. The visa is valid for 4 years.
Business Visitor Visas
If you wish to visit Australia for 3 months or less to attend business meetings or to explore business opportunities, you may be interested in applying for a business visitor visa.
Residence Visa categories:-
Business Talent (Migrant) Visa
Business Talent (Migrant) visas are granted to people with an overall successful business career who are sponsored by an Australia State or Territory government. You are expected to maintain substantial ownership in a business and be involved the management of this business once in Australia. There is no need to apply for a provisional visa before applying for this permanent visa.
Business Owner (Residence) Visa
Business Owner (Residence) visas allow people who have had an ownership interest in an Australian business for at least 2 years to migrate permanently to Australia. You must already hold one of the following Provisional visas to be able to apply:
  • Business Owner (Provisional) visa
  • Senior Executive (Provisional) visa
  • Investor (Provisional) visa
Investor (Residence) Visa
Holders of an Investor (Provisional) visa who have maintained their investment for 4 years can apply for permanent residence.
Existing Australian Business
This visa allows people who have owned a business in Australia for at least 18 months to apply for permanent residence.

2.4.15

Quebec And Saskatchewan Announce Changes To Business Categories For Canadian Immigration

Quebec And Saskatchewan Announce Changes To Business Categories For Canadian Immigration



The Canadian provinces of Quebec and Saskatchewan both revealed changes to the business streams of their immigration programs in recent weeks.
In the case of Quebec, application intake dates for the investor, entrepreneur and self-employed categories were made public, as well as some minor changes to the entrepreneur category, which reopened this week. For Saskatchewan, significant changes were made to the Entrepreneur and Farm Category of the Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP).

Quebec
The government of Quebec has announced that the intake period for applications submitted under the Quebec Investor Program will be from August 31, 2015 to January 29, 2016. There will be a maximum of 1,750 applications accepted for processing, with no more than 1,200 applications accepted from any one country. Candidates with an “advanced intermediate” level in French are not subject to this cap. Moreover, their applications will be given priority processing.

The Quebec Entrepreneur category is designed to allow qualified business owners and managers the opportunity to obtain Canadian permanent residence, provided that they can effectively create or acquire an agricultural, commercial or industrial business in Quebec. Between April 1, 2015 and March 31, 2016, Quebec will receive a maximum of 150 applications under the Entrepreneur Program. Any applications received beyond this limit will be returned to the applicants. In a new change to the previous version of the Entrepreneur category, Entrepreneur applicants who demonstrate that they have an advanced intermediate knowledge of French are not subject to this maximum number of applications and may submit their application at any time. Moreover, these applications will receive priority processing.

The Quebec Self-Employed category is designed to allow qualified individuals the opportunity to obtain Canadian permanent residence, provided that that they can effectively establish themselves in Quebec by practicing a trade or profession. Candidates must have a minimum net work of CAD$100,000 and a minimum of two years’ experience in the profession or trade that they intend to practice after establishing themselves in Quebec.

 Saskatchewan Entrepreneur and Farm Category

The redesigned SINP Entrepreneur and Farm cateogry offers successful candidates and their families the opportunity to establish, acquire or partner in a business in Saskatchewan and be actively involved in its management. Candidates interested in owning and actively operating a business or farming operation are now invited to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) using the new online EOI system.
There are three basic eligibility criteria in the SINP Entrepreneur and Farm category that candidates must meet in order to be selected and approved:
  • A minimum net worth of $500,000 Canadian Dollars (CAD) that can be verified;
  • Accumulation of net worth through legal means, which can be verified; and
  • Minimum three years entrepreneurial or relevant business management experience.
If candidates are approved, they should intend to:
  • Invest a minimum of $300,000 (CAD) in Regina and Saskatoon or a minimum of $200,000 (CAD) in all other Saskatchewan communities;
  • Establish a business that aligns with the points assigned in the Entrepreneur Category Points Grid, if applicable (for investment amount and sector);
  • Own at least one third (33 1/3%) of the equity of a business in Saskatchewan unless your total investment is $1 million CAD or higher;
  • Provide active and on-going participation in the day to day management and direction of the business; and
  • If establishing a new business in Regina or Saskatoon, create two employment opportunities for Canadians or permanent residents in Saskatchewan (non-relative workers).
Click here to get more information about and view the SINP Entrepreneur Category Points Grid

The reaction

“What these changes show, in the grander scheme of things, is that an increasing number of Canadian provinces are using their immigration programs in a more nuanced way to attract qualified business people with a proven record of success,” 
“We’re at a juncture in a number of ways. Little by little, the federal government is giving provinces an increased allocation of spaces for their immigration programs, in doing so offering those provinces more scope to seek out the kind of immigrants they most desire. At the same time, a slight downturn in national economic growth means that provincial governments are looking increasingly to the private sector and entrepreneurial immigrants as they attempt to maximise the potential of the local economy.
“In any event, Canada remains an attractive opportunity for international business people looking to develop their careers. It always has, and most likely always will. The recent changes made to immigration programs in Quebec and Saskatchewan reflect this.”

9.2.15

USA Visa Bulletin For February 2015

USA Visa Bulletin For February 2015

U.S. Department of Homeland Security seal, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services logo
A. STATUTORY NUMBERS
1.  This bulletin summarizes the availability of immigrant numbers during February. Consular officers are required to report to the Department of State documentarily qualified applicants for numerically limited visas; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in the Department of Homeland Security reports applicants for adjustment of status.  Allocations were made, to the extent possible, in chronological order of reported priority dates, for demand received by January 9th.  If not all demand could be satisfied, the category or foreign state in which demand was excessive was deemed oversubscribed.  The cut-off date for an oversubscribed category is the priority date of the first applicant who could not be reached within the numerical limits.  Only applicants who have a priority date earlier than the cut-off date may be allotted a number.  If it becomes necessary during the monthly allocation process to retrogress a cut-off date, supplemental requests for numbers will be honored only if the priority date falls within the new cut-off date announced in this bulletin. If at any time an annual limit were reached, it would be necessary to immediately make the preference category "unavailable", and no further requests for numbers would be honored.
2.  Section 201 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) sets an annual minimum family-sponsored preference limit of 226,000. The worldwide level for annual employment-based preference immigrants is at least 140,000. Section 202 prescribes that the per-country limit for preference immigrants is set at 7% of the total annual family-sponsored and employment-based preference limits, i.e., 25,620. The dependent area limit is set at 2%, or 7,320.
3.  INA Section 203(e) provides that family-sponsored and employment-based preference visas be issued to eligible immigrants in the order in which a petition in behalf of each has been filed.  Section 203(d) provides that spouses and children of preference immigrants are entitled to the same status, and the same order of consideration, if accompanying or following to join the principal.  The visa prorating provisions of Section 202(e) apply to allocations for a foreign state or dependent area when visa demand exceeds the per-country limit.  These provisions apply at present to the following oversubscribed chargeability areas:  CHINA-mainland born, INDIA, MEXICO, and PHILIPPINES.
4.  Section 203(a) of the INA prescribes preference classes for allotment of Family-sponsored immigrant visas as follows:   
FAMILY-SPONSORED PREFERENCES
First: (F1) Unmarried Sons and Daughters of U.S. Citizens:  23,400 plus any numbers not required for fourth preference.
Second: Spouses and Children, and Unmarried Sons and Daughters of Permanent Residents:  114,200, plus the number (if any) by which the worldwide family preference level exceeds 226,000, plus any unused first preference numbers:
A. (F2A) Spouses and Children of Permanent Residents:  77% of the overall second preference limitation, of which 75% are exempt from the per-country limit;
B. (F2B) Unmarried Sons and Daughters (21 years of age or older) of Permanent Residents:  23% of the overall second preference limitation.
Third: (F3) Married Sons and Daughters of U.S. Citizens:  23,400, plus any numbers not required by first and second preferences.
Fourth: (F4) Brothers and Sisters of Adult U.S. Citizens:  65,000, plus any numbers not required by first three preferences.
On the chart below, the listing of a date for any class indicates that the class is oversubscribed (see paragraph 1); "C" means current, i.e., numbers are available for all qualified applicants; and "U" means unavailable, i.e., no numbers are available. (NOTE:  Numbers are available only for applicants whose priority date is earlier than the cut-off date listed below.) 
Family-SponsoredAll Chargeability Areas Except Those ListedCHINA-mainland bornINDIAMEXICOPHILIPPINES
F122JUL0722JUL07 22JUL0701OCT9408JAN05
F2A08MAY1308MAY1308MAY1322APR1308MAY13
F2B22MAY0822MAY0822MAY0815DEC94 22FEB04
F301JAN0401JAN0401JAN0415JAN9415JUL93
F415APR0215APR0215APR0222APR9708AUG91
*NOTE:  For February, F2A numbers EXEMPT from per-country limit are available to applicants from all countries with priority dates earlier than 22APR13.  F2A numbers SUBJECT to per-country limit are available to applicants chargeable to all countries EXCEPT MEXICO with priority dates beginning 22APR13 and earlier than 08MAY13.  (All F2A numbers provided for MEXICO are exempt from the per-country limit; there are no F2A numbers for MEXICO subject to per-country limit.) 
5.  Section 203(b) of the INA prescribes preference classes for allotment of Employment-based immigrant visas as follows: 
EMPLOYMENT-BASED PREFERENCES
First:  Priority Workers:  28.6% of the worldwide employment-based preference level, plus any numbers not required for fourth and fifth preferences.
Second:  Members of the Professions Holding Advanced Degrees or Persons of Exceptional Ability:  28.6% of the worldwide employment-based preference level, plus any numbers not required by first preference.      
Third:  Skilled Workers, Professionals, and Other Workers:  28.6% of the worldwide level, plus any numbers not required by first and second preferences, not more than 10,000 of which to "*Other Workers".
Fourth:  Certain Special Immigrants:  7.1% of the worldwide level.
Fifth:  Employment Creation:  7.1% of the worldwide level, not less than 3,000 of which reserved for investors in a targeted rural or high-unemployment area, and 3,000 set aside for investors in regional centers by Sec. 610 of Pub. L. 102-395.
On the chart below, the listing of a date for any class indicates that the class is oversubscribed (see paragraph 1); "C" means current, i.e., numbers are available for all qualified applicants; and "U" means unavailable, i.e., no numbers are available.  (NOTE:  Numbers are available only for applicants whose priority date is earlier than the cut-off date listed below.) 
Employment- Based
All Chargeability Areas Except Those Listed
CHINA - mainland bornINDIAMEXICOPHILIPPINES
1stCCCCC
2ndC15MAR1001SEP05CC
3rd01JAN1401SEP1122DEC0301JAN1401JAN14
Other Workers01JAN1415AUG0522DEC0301JAN1401JAN14
4thCCCCC
Certain Religious WorkersCCCCC
5th
Targeted
Employment
Areas/
Regional Centers
and Pilot Programs
CCCCC
*Employment Third Preference Other Workers Category:  Section 203(e) of the Nicaraguan and Central American Relief Act (NACARA) passed by Congress in November 1997, as amended by Section 1(e) of Pub. L. 105-139, provides that once the Employment Third Preference Other Worker (EW) cut-off date has reached the priority date of the latest EW petition approved prior to November 19, 1997, the 10,000 EW numbers available for a fiscal year are to be reduced by up to 5,000 annually beginning in the following fiscal year.  This reduction is to be made for as long as necessary to offset adjustments under the NACARA program.  Since the EW cut-off date reached November 19, 1997 during Fiscal Year 2001, the reduction in the EW annual limit to 5,000 began in Fiscal Year 2002.
6.  The Department of State has a recorded message with the cut-off date information which can be heard at:  (202) 485-7699.  This recording is updated on or about the tenth of each month with information on cut-off dates for the following month.
B.  DIVERSITY IMMIGRANT (DV) CATEGORY FOR THE MONTH 
     OF FEBRUARY
 
Section 203(c) of the INA provides up to 55,000 immigrant visas each fiscal year to permit additional immigration opportunities for persons from countries with low admissions during the previous five years. The NACARA stipulates that beginning with DV-99, and for as long as necessary, up to 5,000 of the 55,000 annually-allocated diversity visas will be made available for use under the NACARA program. This resulted in reduction of the DV-2015 annual limit to 50,000. DV visas are divided among six geographic regions.  No one country can receive more than seven percent of the available diversity visas in any one year.
For February, immigrant numbers in the DV category are available to qualified DV-2015 applicants chargeable to all regions/eligible countries as follows. When an allocation cut-off number is shown, visas are available only for applicants with DV regional lottery rank numbers BELOW the specified allocation cut-off number:
RegionAll DV Chargeability Areas Except Those Listed Separately
AFRICA26,000Except:
Egypt:    12,000
Ethiopia: 15,500
ASIA3,825

EUROPE20,500
NORTH AMERICA (BAHAMAS)5
OCEANIA775
SOUTH AMERICA,
and the CARIBBEAN
875
Entitlement to immigrant status in the DV category lasts only through the end of the fiscal (visa) year for which the applicant is selected in the lottery.  The year of entitlement for all applicants registered for the DV-2015 program ends as of September 30, 2015.  DV visas may not be issued to DV-2015 applicants after that date.  Similarly, spouses and children accompanying or following to join DV-2015 principals are only entitled to derivative DV status until September 30, 2015.  DV visa availability through the very end of
FY-2015 cannot be taken for granted.  Numbers could be exhausted prior to September 30.
C.  THE DIVERSITY (DV) IMMIGRANT CATEGORY RANK CUT-OFFS 
     WHICH WILL APPLY IN MARCH
For March, immigrant numbers in the DV category are available to qualified DV-2015 applicants chargeable to all regions/eligible countries as follows. When an allocation cut-off number is shown, visas are available only for applicants with DV regional lottery rank numbers BELOW the specified allocation cut-off number:
RegionAll DV Chargeability Areas Except Those Listed Separately
AFRICA27,800Except:
Egypt:      15,700
Ethiopia:   18,900
ASIA4,300
EUROPE24,000
NORTH AMERICA (BAHAMAS)6
OCEANIA875
SOUTH AMERICA,
and the CARIBBEAN
925
D.  VISA AVAILABILITY IN THE COMING MONTHS
FAMILY-sponsored categories (potential monthly movement)
Worldwide dates:
F1: Up to three weeks
F2A: Three or four weeks
F2B: Three to six weeks
F3: Up to three weeks
F4: Two to four weeks
EMPLOYMENT-based categories (potential monthly movement)
Employment First: Current
Employment Second:
Worldwide: Current
China:        Three to six weeks
India:         Four to six months
Employment Third:
Worldwide: Rapid forward movement for at least another month or two. The rapid movement in recent months should generate a significant amount of demand for numbers. Once such demand materializes at the anticipated rate it will have a direct impact on this cut-off date. 
China:        Rapid forward movement. Such movement is likely to result
                 in a dramatic increase in demand which could require
                 "corrective" action within the next six months.
India:         Up to two weeks
Mexico:       Will remain at the worldwide date
Philippines:  Will remain at the worldwide date. Increased demand may
                  require "corrective" action at some point later in the
                  fiscal year. 
Employment Fourth: Current
Employment Fifth: Current - for most countries. The expected increase in
                            China-mainland born demand would require the
                            establishment of a cut-off date for such applicants
                            no later than the summer months. 
                         
                            The category will remain "Current" for all other countries
                            for the foreseeable future. 
The above projections for the Family and Employment categories indicate what is likely to happen on a monthly basis through May based on current applicant demand patterns. Readers should never assume that recent trends in cut-off date movements are guaranteed for the future, or that "corrective" action will not be required at some point in an effort to maintain number use within the applicable annual limits. The determination of the actual monthly cut-off dates is subject to monthly fluctuations in applicant demand and a number of other variables. 
E.  OBTAINING THE MONTHLY VISA BULLETIN
To be placed on the Department of State’s E-mail subscription list for the “Visa Bulletin”, please send an E-mail to the following E-mail address:
and in the message body type:
Subscribe Visa-Bulletin 
(example: Subscribe Visa-Bulletin)
To be removed from the Department of State’s E-mail subscription list for the “Visa Bulletin”, send an e-mail message to the following E-mail address:
and in the message body type: Signoff Visa-Bulletin
The Department of State also has available a recorded message with visa cut-off dates which can be heard at: (202) 485-7699. The recording is normally updated on/about the 10th of each month with information on cut-off dates for the following month.
Readers may submit questions regarding Visa Bulletin related items by E-mail at the following address:
(This address cannot be used to subscribe to the Visa Bulletin.)
Department of State Publication 9514
CA/VO:   January 9, 2015
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